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DescriptionEdit

Depending on the size of a network, you will have to determine if it's better to put a set of computers on a workgroup or a domain. The general rule of thumb is that if you have less than ten computers, put them on a workgroup, more than ten will be on a domain.

To See What A Computer Is On:Edit

1. To check if a computer is on a network or a domain, use the Win+Pause/break keyboard shortcut to bring up "System Properties" (or Run - sysdm.cpl). Then navigate to the "Computer Name" tab. It will say if you are on one or the other.

Differences Between Them:Edit

1. Choose a workgroup if: You want all users to have their own username and password for each machine, security settings and other system settings will have to be adjusted on each machine, and you have a smaller network that you will most likely not expand for a while.

2. Choose a domain if: You want to have roaming profiles so users can login with their account on each machine, you want centralized management of all users, computers, even printers, and you want to apply system/ security settings from the domain controller server. Great for companies that use more than 10 computers.

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